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with the boston newsletter in 1704. it wasn't until 15 years later we have the second printed also in boston, the boston gazette. coincidently the next day the third newspapers started in philadelphia. circulation. the top 100 newspapers in america average circulation of approximately 200,000. at the time of the american revolution circulation was approximately 600. it sounds awfully low, but keep in mind these newspapers were also read aloud in private homes and so while subscribership recirculation might be low, actual readership is quite significant. distribution. we have internet. we have telephones -- and sorry, tv and radio today. back then distribution was done primarily through horse back in shape, commonly called talk about. today, news is instantaneous. its on demand. flip open your phone and have almost real-time music or fingertips. 200 plus years ago the news came up -- the news came weekly. i'm sorry, the news came weekly, so the timeline or you open up a newspaper was mr. matteo to several months old. a large part of that was just the amount of transit time but had to go in to
for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about thi
of being free," and you're watching c-span2. >> host: now from the archives, the history of the boston tea party which occurred on 1773. the author reports that the demonstration against the british collection of import duties was composed of smugglers and tax evaders led by lawyer james ottis jr. and brewer sam adams. they recount the protest spread throughout the country including assaults that spurredded george washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "
growing up. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is kind of local royalty. everyone knew his mother's family and his father's family and his father was a well-known prominent awesome politician and very well respected businessman. joseph kennedy went to boston. he went out with the prettiest girl in boston who also happen to be the mayor's daughter. whom he would later marry. everybody knew who he was. he was class president. again, he felt a part of the community. 10% of the student populations were catholics. in a large number of public schools. it was only when he graduated from harvard in 1912 that he understood what it meant to be irish catholics on of an east boston politician. he wanted to go in banking and finance. he didn't get a job or a job offer or an interview. his classmates, some of who were not as good as numbers as he was, none of whom were as articulate and charming as he was, his friends were constant on-off jobs. even in their family banks or in other banks. the only way he could get into banking was to take a civil serv
that is stored at the kennedy library in boston but close to researchers, and you will see the book coming you into the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it's between hard covers, and i won't be coming back to you for permission to decide anything whatever i find i'm going to use in the book. he said okay then it took 18 months to get this in writing and i was off and running. and i found a more remarkable story than i had imagined. i found the story of a man who spent his life moving back-and-forth from being an outsider to an insider to an outsider to an insider. i found the story of an irish catholic who wasn't ashamed of his heritage but didn't want to be defined by eight. of a third-generation immigrant who cared little about the country, his grandparents had been born, who had no desire to visit ireland or to read about it, who considered themselves 100% american and couldn't understand why anyone would think of him as less than that, a catholic who went to mass every sunday and went to confession, and the catholic church in boston was the anchor of his e
the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i voluntee
it became belaboring boston but spend close to researchers. and you will see the book come to you in the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it is between hard covers, not before. i won't be coming back to you for permission to cite anything. whatever i find them going to use in the book. he said okay. then it took 18 months to get the solid writing and i was off and running. and i found some more remarkable story that i even imagined i would find. i found the story of a man who spent his life moving back and forth have been an outsider to insider to an outsider to insider. i found the story of an irish catholic who is not ashamed of his heritage, but didn't want to be defined by it. of the third-generation immigrant who cares little about the country, who have no desire to visit ireland or to read about it, who considered himself 100% american and couldn't understand why anyone would think of them as less than that. who is a catholic who went to mass every sunday, went to confession and the catholic church in boston as the anchor of his existence an
in the middle of buzzer beater season. i'm talking basketball. for this one, let's go to boston. the videos from the boston herald. this is high school basketball game between east boston and madison park. boston city rivals. wait until you see the finish on this. johnny bowden was shooting a three. that means three free throws. put madison park up 42-40. he misses the third free throw on the purpose to try to run out the clock. but watch this. boom, that is an 80-foot cannon of a shoot from pat santos. gets the rebound, launches this ball the length of the court. obviously a three-pointer, puts his team up 43-42, no time left. crowd rushes to the court. game over. >> should have ran out. one second. one second. >> madison park coach obviously not so happy with the finish but the hero for the day. >> please tell me that's the quarterback for the high school because he can really throw that ball. >> he's definitely got an arm. it's something you can't practice. that's just an athlete being an athlete. awesome finish to a game. >> this is ellie with 10 reasons why boobs are great. >> one, babies g
. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
an individual candidate's performance. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by
had no desire to run for president again, at least at first. we have more on that story from boston. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> reporter: as mitt romney, members of his campaign staff and top gop leaders continue assessing how he lost the election to a vulnerable incumbent president, the oldest son of the former massachusetts governor is raising eyebrows about his dad's initial reluctance to make a second white house run. in a story published in the "boston globe" tagg romney said his father, quote, wanted to be president less than anyone. he would have been ecstatic to step aside. "boston globe" reporter michael krenish interviewed tagg romney. >> i know there were serious discussions at the time before he decided to run and he looked at the field of competition and saw it was pretty waeak and his family pushed him. >> reporter: nbc's garrett hake spent a year and a half covering the romney campaign. >> in between campaigns romney was definitely stung by the loss but he never took his eye off the ball. he wrote a book about his own
to harvard, live in boston. now you live -- you went to harvard, who lived in boston. now you live in connecticut. do they care this much about history? >> they do. i gave a talk in madison conn a week ago. they are very interested and enthusiastic. in new england, 1775 -- in the south, only south carolina and virginia were doing anything of any importance in 1775. north carolina was too divided and georgia did not matter much. but new england was out in front. the british knew that big trouble was coming out of new england. >> why? what was the reason that the patriots wanted to be separated from great britain? >> you have to take it in layers. the underlying population in new england tended to come in the beginning from east anglia, which was the old section of england that was the most against the crown and found no support for the parliamentary side in the civil war. after parliament triad's but loses and the restoration. -- parliament triumphs but loses in the restoration. you see so many names of towns in eastern massachusetts that are also the names of towns in east anglia.
] >> after the boston massacre there was a brief discussion should be sent a ship's captain? a bostonian said i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate prices plunged and we were in a financial panic i started to think more about ms. green and how she's survived ms. green and how she's survived many financial crisis. there were no diaries then i remember someth
. boston that is the weather maker that brought us the wet snow earlier today, not much accumulation, the high pressure moving in from the west. the wind is really beginning to pick up. if the wind gusts 25-30 continuing to increase as we go over night and early morning hours. tomorrow morning, if you have to walk the dog definitely bundle up. 25-32, but with the wind out of the northwest at 15-25, it will feel like the upper teens. coming up, we will talk about the forecast for the rest of the year into 2013, and if you are headed to the big football game tomorrow night, what to expect. >> just three days until the country reaches the so-called fiscal cliff, and the deal could be coming together as soon as tomorrow. richard reeve joins us from the newsroom. what we are hearing is this deal may not cover everything? >> that is right, the temporary payroll tax cut is set to expire, affecting everyone getting a paycheck. we are told senate leaders are trying everything, private conferences, phone call, email trying to hammer out a deal before the deadline. the clock is ticking, just th
and boston, the bull's-eye right now. not havethe wind will really begin to increase, and we could have went gusts up to 35-40 m.p.h. all the warnings have been canceled for the immediate metro. if your travel plans ticket to the wewestern allegany, still the potential of additional snowfall. gradual clearing for the evening, 34-40, the wind increasing. the wind chill factor will decrease. by tomorrow morning, the wind chill factor in the teens across much of the region. coming up, what to expect new year's eve into 2013. >> for the second time in less than a week, we're talking about a fire in greenbelt, md., out with a report. unfortunately, this one claim somebody's life. >> the greenbelt fire chief is going door to door, making sure that residents are protecting themselves against worst-case scenarios. >> it is a board to have a working smoke detector and keep the batteries there. unfortunately, we had a fatality. if an elderly woman was killed, two other injured friday night. >> i heard all of this racket, all of the machinery, the fire engines and the bright lights. it could wake the d
, in the area from washington d.c. to new york and boston. and let me say i think it is absolutely critical that we develop that corridor. not only the regional interest but the national interest. we have the highest concentration of population, the most sophisticated delivery system and interconnection, we have light rail, subway, metro, connectors all up and down the corridor so that high-speed rail is not something that will run by itself as opposed to last week where we heard about the major red ministrations effort to produce high speed, they're doing it between bakersfield and fresno, california where there are very few people, their contention is long-term connected in population centers in san francisco and los angeles, but it will be a long time before that is accomplished. right now we do have the connectivity we need to, the population, and we also have the only corridor, 430 some mile corridor almost entirely unknown by amtrak, the american people and the taxpayers. that is opposed to the rest of amtrak service, 20,000 miles of service, long-distance, inner-city service, on whic
. the winter weather aspect of our storm very much alive. heavy rain along i-95 in boston, throughout your thursday. the heavy snow blanketing new england. many areas could pick up over one foot of snow. muhammad and brandi back to you. >> thank you, andrew. >>> former president george h.w. bush is in intensive care after another health setback. a spokesman says doctors are not able to lower mr. bush's high fever. so, he is on a liquid diet. he is said to be alert and conversing with medical staff. the spokesperson says doctors are cautiously optimistic. >> he's in a bad way. but the doctors believe there's a path for him to recover from this. and if we can get him to rally a little bit, we can start talking about a discharge date. but we're not there yet. >> former first lady, barbara bush, and the former president's children have been at his bedside during this medical crisis. >>> former south african president nelson mandela is out of the hospital. the anti-apartheid icon spent more than two weeks in the hospital with a lung infection and other ailments. the 94-year-old will receive oth
there in boston, harvey leonard at channel five. harvey, always great to see you. you were telling us, another big part of the story, not just the snow we saw there in john's piece, but the rain and the winds there in new england. >> yeah, great to be working with you, david. and i got to tell you, the wind gusted to just about hurricane force, along the coast of massachusetts. in addition, rainfall amounts, two and three inches, localized flooding. and the big wind did cause problems at the time of high tide. fortunately, the tides were low. if they were high, there would have been a lot of coastal flooding and damage. >> and harvey, as this system now moves off, we've got another one right on our doorstep. >> yeah, that one is going to develop in the gulf, pick up a little bit of moisture, start to move northeast. saturday is the day that all the major cities in the northeast from washington to boston will be affected. most likely a couple of inches of snow. because i don't think the storm will really explode until it is well off the coast. but if it intensifies more quickly, those amounts could
report from nbc's ron mott in boston. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> reporter: as mitt romney, members of his campaign staff and top gop leaders continue assessing how he lost the election to a vulnerable incumbent president, the oldest son of the former massachusetts governor is raises eyebrows about his dad's initial reluctance to make a second white house run. in a story published in sunday's "boston globe," tag romney says his father "wanted to be president less than anyone i've met in my life. he had no desire to run. if could have found someone else to take his place, we have been ecstatic to step aside" "boston globe" reporter michael krenish interviewed tag romney. >> i know there were serious discussion and concerns at the time before he decided to run and lacked at the field of competition and saw it was pretty weak. his family pushed him to say he would be the best person, gimp the wait field has taken shape. >> reporter: nbc's garrett haake spent a year cover the campaign. >> in between campaign romney was stunned by the loss bu
boston.é boston.ékerry diddnot speak at & ttday's announcementthe 3 without the presence of & current secretary hillary -3 clinton who is at home ... recuperating from a concussion she ustained whennshe fainted. &p3 3 three people are charred with murder toniggt affer & investigators say they causedd a natural as eepllsion too collect insurance money. money. his was the aftermath oo the november 13th people and iijured 12 others. -3 33 homes were leeeled invessigators say was intentional. they say these three disconnected the gas line to their ffrepllce and sst the microwave to o off as aacrude detonator. at first the three claimed they were victiis like everyone else but police found they 3 valuables, family ppott albums and their pets just days 3 3&pwhat we as the public safety community can do ann muut do is o devote our best efforts to ensure thattjjstice is done on behhlf of succ innncent victims. 3 the initial tip that this was a urder came from the woman's son, who toll police that his moo's boyfriind had been plotting o blo
storm. new york city, south connecticut, and south of boston going to get the biggest snow totals. let me show you what you can expect in the way of snow totals. the pink area is two to five inches, broad brush in pennsylvania. see that maroon spot south of boston, that's where we get the five to ten-inch area. near a foot south of boston locally. it's going to be an interesting one here at the airports. boston and new york included, in heavy delays today. and you have moderate delays back here. detroit, chicago, some cold and some wind going to affect them. los angeles will have rain. so, it doesn't just stop on the east coast. we have travel trouble in other places. but on the roads, anywhere in the pacific northwest could be a little slippery. and certainly, with this storm, again, from ohio all the way to maine. back to bianna. >> a travel nightmare for so many people. ginger, thank you. >>> we're going to turn to the desperate, last-ditch effort to try to keep the country from falling off the fiscal cliff, sending everybody's taxes up and possibly sending the country into another
week. then i had some dental issues that resulted in canceling the boston to work. i would love to meet him. my dream is at some new england seafood place. i am a bostonian. and he would pick up the check for us. >> their times -- i know you say that winston churchill travel to the united states 16 times. how many times did he ask fdr to get into the war? clacks out one -- >> at one point, he took to begging. he asked for destroyers. fdr said no. then he said maybe. then the first five or six dribbled in. they were rustbuckets. he told congress -- more last -- look at the deal i just made. we gave them drunk. at one point that summer, churchill i asked roosevelt to declare war. he was desperate. and so after a few brandies, and you will see churchill's saying "those americans are not good americans. they want us to bleed to death and come in and pick up everything for free." at one. he talked about having everyone in england mill there wedding rings to raise $10 million worth of gold to buy american goods. to shame the americans. they did not do that. >> how much did winston churchill e
shown in professional exhibitions. winslow was born in boston in 1836. at t age of 21, after two years of drudgery apprenticed to a commercial lithographer, he vowed he would never have another master and set up his studio at 22 winter street, in a building with publisher m.m. ballou. true to his new england background, homer was forthright and self-reliant. above all, he valued his independence, soon establishing himself as a free-lance illustrator for ballou's pictorial. homer's first important illustration was published in 1857, and within a year, his work began to appear in harper's weekly. his early pictures recorded the ordinary manners and pleasures of american life, reflecting a mood of national self-confidence prior to the civil war. his sketch of the skating pond in central park was published by harper's in january 1860, shortly after homer had moved to new york city. in new york, homer took a few lessons in painting from frederic rondel. rondel was a rather sentimental landscape painter who had little influence on homer's style beyond his technical instruction in the use of
would wonder how i'd have access to that information. there is -- >> well, you're among all those boston scholars. what do you do in recreation, don't you ask questions like -- >> no, that tends not to be one of the things we talk about. with my grandmother, yes. with scholars, no. >> so you come down on the side that it was a true virgin birth, correct? >> i think it's very clear that the gospel writers thought so. appear we have no information with which to dispute them. i'm willing to go with it. >> may i say one more thing on this point? one of the things that the gospel writers do and matthew and luke in particular of the four that we have, is that they turn to using the bible, the jewish bible, the only one there is when they're writing, which is an ancient, ancient text, and they use it for factual information about the biography of jesus. it would be a little bit like you deciding to write a biography of jfk and using king leelear for factual biographical information for jfk. >> what were they trying to do? apparently they were not reporters on the scene. they were not doing a re
based on the quill. >>> overeating may be a strong indicator your kid is using drugs. a boston children's hospital study looked at people ages 9 to 24 and found a connection between overeaters and drug use. researchers say it suggest that is lack of control may lead to overeating. nutritionists say it's another good reason to screen teens for eating problems. >>> something fishy about new york seafood. a study by a conservation group found a shocking amount of mislabeling. grocery stores in new york were found swapping fish. studies in boston, miami and l.a. had similar findings. >>> the winter veggies are out in your produce aisle. tony and his daughter stephanie have tony's table. >> pasta with all winter vegetables. >> the star of this pasta is this beautiful kale. buy it like this at the market already cleaned for you. you should clean it when you bring it home but in a bag without the stems. >> so we have the kale and there was a little bit of chicken stock and oil and salt and then some carrots and broccoli. >> the pasta is fettucini. love this flattened noodle. it's so great with
's views. >>> and still ahead, the video showing true heroism by an officer in boston. the lengths he goes to save a woman in desperate need. >>> and we've got another one coming on, after we've added quite a bit to the rain buckets in the bay area. there is more. we'll have the details after a break. ,, ,,,,,,,, union workers for the rale' grocery chain have ratified their new labor contract. the two-year deal includes and benefit concessions for t 7,000 workers, inclu >>> union workers for the raley's grocery chain have ratified their contract. the contract includes wage and benefits. the union went on strike before thanksgiving. it was the first strike in the chain's 77-year history. >>> berkeley police have a new cell phone warning tonight. they say thieves are approaching people and asking to borrow their phone to make an emergency call to a sick relative. when people hand over the phone, the thief takes off. police advise never lending a phone or even taking it out to give somebody the time. there's been a rash of thefts using that approach. >>> and there could be another tax hike on
at weather from across the country on this christmas eve. last-minute shoppers in boston and chicago could see light know. also early showers and clearing in l.a. rain in louisville and cincinnati. >> and blast of arctic air is hitting the upper midwest. fargo barely makes it above zero. honolulu and miami, the hot spots, near 80. seattle and portland, the 40s. >>> in other news this morning, a senator from idaho is apologizing today after being arrested for driving drunk. police in suburban washington say mike crapo was pulled over after running a red light yesterday. he failed several sobriety tests. he was taken to jail and released on bond. he's expected to be in court in january. he says he takes total responsibility. >>> overseas to afghanistan. abc news has learned a top navy s.e.a.l. commander has died. the death of 42-year-old job price is being investigated as suicide. military officials say he died of a gunshot wound. he was a member of s.e.a.l. team 4, a special navy warfare unit. >>> only one week to go now and there is still no deal preventing the economy from going over that
. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> finally tonight, we leave you with some much-needed good news. first from boston where a police officer risked his life to save a young woman. he jumped into the frigid boston harbor when he heard the woman screaming for help. the whole thing was caught on a cell phone. he held her until a life ring was thrown to them. both were treated for hypothermia but they'll be okay. no word on what she was doing in the water. >>> wildlife officers ventured onto the thin ice to rescue a buck. a row boat was pushed out to help the frightened animal. they got him back to shore and released him, tired, battered but okay. and that's okay for the end of this day's news. that will do it for eyewitness news at 11. for now, from the cbs studios, high above broadway, in san francisco, i'm brian hackney along with gary gelfand. ann notarangelo will be back next saturday. appreciate you watching. have a good night! ,,,,,,,,,, previously on two and a half men... darling, what's mine is yours. we do not need a prenup. and i just want you to know i'm not after your father's money. i'm sure you're not. believe m
have gotten a lot of miles out of this uniform. where are you from? >> we're from boston. >> that is great. i do the boston marathons there. >> oh, you do? >> yeah. i love the holidays. when i was little i would come down with my parents and walk around union square and now i get paid to be here. you have to have a gimmick and this is a great one. happy holidays. see you real soon. thanks. so bye-bye. >> and again that was gregory grinsell one of our photojournalists who put that together on our special holiday in focus day that airs christmas day at noon and 5:30 on ktvu and 7:00 p.m. on k icu tv 36. >>> moving on, thousands of nurses getting ready to walk off the job. still to come the reason behind their christmas eve strike. >>> a key senator weighs in on the fiscal cliff and why he is confident a deal will be made before the year ends. . >>> thousands of registered nurses plan to walk out of bay area sutter health hospitals on christmas eve of the one-day strike is part of an ongoing battle between the california nurses association over health benefits and sick d
like chicago, seattle and boston. >> and driven to distraction. the danger pedestrians and drivers face navigating one of the bay area's busiest cities. >> at least weather isn't a problem tonight. all the rain has dried up today. looks like we have a fairly nice night ahead. it's going to stay that way for a while. forecast coming up. ,,,,,,,,,, >>> his temper earned him the nickname stormin norman. we learned that norman schwarzkopf died today in tampa, florida. he spent his life in the military. in vietnam he famously led his men through a mine field by having the mines marked with shaving cream. he's best known for commanding the american-led coalition in the first iraq war. norman schwarzkopf was 78. >> heartbreaking news for parents hoping to adopt russian orphans. the country's president announced he will sign a law banning such adoptions. grace lee on the youngest victims of this international tug of war. >> our children are very much excited to having a baby brother. we set up his room together. >> reporter: the family spent the holidays with their two biological children, nath
advantage. good to have you on the show today. > > thank you. a threatened port strike from boston to houston could put a lot of cargo in limbo, about 40% of all imports into the u.s. it could happen as early as sunday. and in our cover story, that could leave spring merchandise sitting on the high seas instead of store shelves. nearly 15,000 longshoremen may go on strike sunday if negotiators with commercial cargo shippers cannot reach agreement on a new six-year contract. and there is some hope - both sides agree to resume talks before an extended december 29th deadline. but if talks fail, would the fiscal cliff and a port strike be a one-two punch to the economy? "if its a couple of days, i think ultimately it would be a blip on the radar, but if it goes two weeks, it becomes a much greater problem." a key sticking point involves a fee longshoremen receive for each container that arrives in port. the container royalty fee was invented to help offset the need for fewer workers during the transition from bulk cargo to containers in the 1950s and 60s. shippers want the fee limited.
live, i was close to boston. i had such a great time in boston but i did not like massachusetts so much because it was cold, the culture was foreign to me. when i came to san francisco, the first time i came, there was a rainbow over the bay and there was something calling me. i was 20 at the time. i knew that this was a place i needed to live. the history here, you can see it in terms of buildings, you know the history from, labor history, hit the history, history of what happened in 1978 with milk, mosconi. but i wanted to be a part of its. >> what got you involved in politics? >> i had been involved in politics for decades. i was doing work around central america, supporting people in central america, protecting against u.s. imperialism, and their right to live. i was doing a lot of work on campus in college. head of work against apartheid. i was involved in a lot of the efforts to push back on efforts to remove affirmative action, prop 209, all kinds of work around ballot measures that were tough, big ideas, like single payer, but i never got involved in supporting a candidate. i ne
to battle the weather as they made their way home from christmas. roads from the ohio valley to the boston area were slick. the weather caused several accidents as you can imagine on roads that look like that. >> no fun. they're getting hammered up in new england right now. boston, even cape cod. >> a lot of snow up there. >> yeah. >> it didn't take much in our area up in northern maryland. i was coming south of 95 today. doesn't take much to make it slippery. >> they got several inches out there in western virginia and northern and western maryland. we have some pictures that you guys have been sharing with us. we want to start off with a snowy scene. in western virginia here this is over between round hill and hillsboro. really beautiful farm. you can see the snow coming down. i got several inches out there. the most i found so far is out in frostburg, maryland 4 inches and west of there garret county even more. now this is earlier today. this dog had a good time and i would imagine he probably brought in a few muddy paw prints. what do you think? >> wet. >> you're a dog owner. you know
from boston to houston were ready to go on strike sunday. those ports move about 40% of the nation's container cargo traffic. we enjoyed sunshine across the region, but the big story is tomorrow's potential snow. steve rudin is here to talk about that. >> we are watching the maps right now. right now it appears we will see a little bit of snow here in the d.c. area, but not a ton. take a look at the travel forecast. no problems for indianapolis, detroit, new york city and boston. you will find absolutely beautiful conditions as you head to the center of the country. we are watching a storm system to the lower left-hand corner of the screen. this is what is on its way tomorrow. it will start off as a bit of a wintry mix changing over to right now it appears mainly rain. already we do have a winter weather advisory set to go into effect late tonight into the day tomorrow. north and west of d.c., including frederick maryland, and the panhandle of west virginia. what to expect and when coming up in just a few minutes from the bill for whether -- belfort furniture weather center. >> a n
you something from boston northward where the wind chills are in the teens. in the plains we've warmed it up. as far as bad weather, light rain out there. some snow showers heading through areas of northern wisconsin and northern minnesota. overall, it's an inactive day today. after the cold start new england will warm up to the 40s. that's a look at the national forecast. now here's a look at the weather outside your window. we will see a little bit of a chance of rain in the pacific north west. salt lake city, utah, a chance of showers. 49. boston again, very cold afternoon. people in the northeast, you know, we kind of get spoiled with the warm temps. this morning is reality. >> yeah, exactly. we knew it was coming. it's december. we'll take it. bill, thanks so much. >>> there's some good news in the fight against cancer and that cup of starbucks may be a little more difficult to find. plus, john mcafee is finally in custody. what did he know about the death of his neighbor. why was he fleeing police for three weeks. this is "early today" on nbc. >>> welcome back. stories making new
england. heavy rain around boston, new york, philly, and d.c. thunderstorms from cincinnati to the gulf coast. >> 60s from new orleans to the northeast. 12 in the twin cities. mostly 40s in the rockies. >>> coming up, we'll hear from the deejays who posed as british royals and are being blamed for the suicide of a surs. >>> falling gas prices. >>> josh brent of the cowboys, out of jail and struggling with the death of teammate and a friend. >>> there could be a christmas gift for you at the gas pump. lower prices. the average price may be close to $3 a gallon for the holidays. wholesale prices are falling fast as supplied rise and demand drops. a top analyst says the plunge is not even over yet. this morning, the average price is $3.35 gallon. >>> some disappointing news from the stores. consumer spending this summer was not as good as first thought. there are signs we're still bng careful with our money. figures out thursday are expected to show only a modest increase in retail sales last month. >>> more bad news this morning for the people that used to make twinkies. hostess said it u
. with suitcase full of gifts. >> where are you headed? >> arkansas and then kansas. >> boston. >> oklahoma. >> new york city. >> we're going to california. >> the story was much the day. rain and storms. 100,000 passengers are expected to pass through the atlanta airport today alone. >> it impacted us from departure standpoint. flights have been delayed on each push. throughout the concourses but here in check-in we have been able to get passengers, pretty steadily through. on a regular basis. like any other day. >> snow created havoc for skiers to the west to hit the slopes. some city saw six to 12 inches of fresh powder. northeast and mid-atlantic freezing rainfall has people scrambling to get out, even as they wish for a white christmas. >> looking forward to white christmas. >> we had adequate staffing and got the passengers out quickly. today is a good day. >> triple-a predicts 84 million americans will take to the roads this holiday season. driving 786 miles round trip. >> we are seeing to see the major storms develop on many part of the country there. could be major delay at airport
city. you went to colgate, which was upstate new york. >> that's right. >> you live in boston and went to harvard. 9/11 maryland. what do you feel living in connecticut? do they care much today about this kind of district? >> as a matter of fact they do. i did a talk in madison, conn. got very interested and enthusiastic audience. i would say that the new england probably 1775 more than anywhere else, because in the south, only south carolina and virginia were doing anything of any importance in 1775. north carolina is too divided and georgia did not matter much. but in england was out in front. the british knew the big trouble was coming out of new england. >> what was the reason the patriots wanted to be separated from great britain? >> a number of layers. the underlying population of new england tended to, the beginning from east anglia, which was the old section of england that was most against the crown and we saw that in the english civil war. after parliament triumphs but then loses in the restoration, you have a continuing flow out of east anglia. a lot of the settlements in th
soon. the weather maker early this morning, jetting off to the north and east beginning to exit boston where they got a lot of snow. for us, not much at all, just a note ugly day. the high pressure pushing from the west, gusty wind, remaining with us through the day tomorrow. late afternoon evening hours settles down a little bit. no warnings for the immediate metro. if travel plans to keep the garrett county, extreme western maryland, the winter storm warnings continue until 7:00 in the morning. the temperatures tomorrow, 35- 40, but with the wind chill at feel in the 20's. monday, new year's eve, showers popping up, mixing with some snow, not anticipating a lot. 25-32 the evening lows, the same wind tomorrow 25-30 the temperatures in the upper 30's. the game day forecast, " this is a winner. the temperature at 34 degrees at kickoff time. that is a little after 8:00. the wind will be about 25 m.p.h. and as we move into the start of 2013, a little bit of a cold start, but nothing brutally cold. but look at fry, 34 degrees. but there is no moisture, so no snow. >> pack some hot chocolat
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